Hill End ringtail and currarong shroud

Today I could see (and I had heard) another rain event was headed our way so I decided to deinstall the Hill End Shroud. The prints worked very well especially the ringtail. I strung up a line in the woodshed so it could hopefully dry out a bit before it is packed on Saturday for the early morning Sunday trip home. Yesterday I had been invited to brekky at Dan and Vik’s house (short for viking and he was building a model boat when I arrived!). Like all places in Hill End on lease it is a restored 19th century ruin and absolutely beautiful miniature spaces in multiple buildings with earthen walls and wooden panel ceilings that set off the colourful personal collections of art and antiques brilliantly. Today I had (great) coffee at Genevieve and Bill’s place (home of Hill End Press) which was equally breathtaking and had the additional embellishments born from their eclectic art practices and those collected from artist friends. It was a wonderful first visit (and back for dinner on Saturday!) hopefully the first of many. I then delivered my work to Dave, he was very happy and gave me a free coffee.

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Hill End Last Week

After 3 weeks of adjustment and cathartic emotions I have finally found peace in my solitude and the spring has brought wonderful warm days to Hill End. People are returning, more wonderful members of the community have introduced themselves and I have been painting like mad. I even made a painting for cafe Dave. I painted it over a 2 dollar shop photo print that makes it look like the kangaroo and bush in the Haefliger’s yard is in a vortex.

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Hill End Day 14

Today is a Saturday and after my jog I drove into Bathurst. First stop is always Hub for brekky/brunch and I was reading the letters between Sunday Reed and Joy Hester in my solitude (a book from Haefliger’s library) feeling very bohemian. I shopped at the art store, farmer’s market and then poxland before heading back to HE. Darren and Shaye were visiting me this weekend so we went to History Hill. What a bizarre and overwhelming place. The deconstructed town has been assembled within its dark underground interior. The rusted spooky collection of 19th century artefacts are punctuated by witty labels and additional effigies created by the assembler(s) that lend a 20th century local humour to what are extreme contrasts between male/female, Western/Eastern and the lone corner of a cabinet dedicated to the Wiradjuri that feature the most hideous neck shackles I have ever seen, their origins – the African American slave. I took over 100 photos and so there will be two image installments. A couple of notable items were the carved pipes and large locks. An installation of scales is a formidable sign of the gold rush town.

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